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Overcoming Artist’s Block (Part 2)




Following up on Overcoming Artist’s Block (Part 1)


Once you are ready to start working again you will know it
instinctively. All artists go through periods of ‘creative block’—it’s normal, but after one such episode there are ways of stimulating ideas and getting the creative juices flowing again.

Visit your local library and take out books that cover materials, techniques and subjects that are not familiar to you. If you are a watercolor artist, why not try oils for once? If you paint large acrylic abstracts, would it be possible to try soft pastels on a smaller scale? What results could you achieve by doing something completely different to what you're used to?

What about trying collage or mixed media work? Take photos of your neighborhood, family or friends. Local places of interest, the countryside, the seashore, the city. Manipulate your photos on your PC and print out as digital art. Use the images, either natural or manipulated as collage pieces. It is so therapeutic cutting pieces and sticking them down. Use a range of materials to finish your work.

Instead of going straight back to paintings or drawings on normal scale, why not create some miniature pieces? How about greetings cards? White card ‘blanks’ are very easy to source. How delighted family, friends or customers would be to own a unique hand painted card.

Try drawing for once instead of painting, if that’s your usual medium, or vice versa. Fill a sketchbook with small quick sketches. You could even time yourself. Three or five minutes maximum for each sketch.

When you’re ready to go full size again, try loosening up your technique, by again setting a time limit for each piece of work
you create. With a deadline to meet, you will speed up and loosen up. Try not to be precious with your art. Be quick and bold—see what happens.

Paint upside down. Start a new piece, then half way through turn the paper or canvas round 90 degrees. This is a great technique for abstracts. Use new colors—let them flow into each other. Splatter colors onto the wet surface. If you like, you could turn the work once more to finish. What a great way to create ‘happy accidents’.

Paint or draw to music. Use only your emotion to make marks on the surface of your support. Play your favorite rock, pop or classical music, let the melodies and rhythms wash over you, influencing how your artwork evolves. I often paint to ‘Smile’ by Brian Wilson… and boy do I get inspired!

What about painting left handed if you’re a right-hander and vice versa. Trying to do a representational work with your weakest side will produce art that is still yours, but will have a completely different edge to it. Challenging and great fun to do… if you have the discipline!

Finally, once you get back into full flow, remind yourself of all the artwork you have created successfully. How appreciated you are by your customers. Read their testimonials. Feel that glow again, when you realize that your creativity block was only temporary and that there are fans out there just waiting for you to release some wonderful new artwork into the arena.





Cover image and top image from Shutterstock and The Creative Finder.



This is a cross-post from Ezine Articles.




Gail Miller is a professional artist whose artwork is a visual feast of color and fun. Her fascination with bold colors and fluid, expressive shapes and line are evident in funky abstracts, sinuous nudes, vibrant still life paintings and lively townscapes. Visit her website at http://www.gailmiller.com.

 
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