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Radical Axis Illustrates Animation Strength

Radical Axis, an Atlanta studio that specializes in animation and design for broadcast, is quickly establishing itself as a strong player in the broadcast animation field. Focusing on development, episodic and commercial work, Radical Axis continues to experience amazing growth with sales increasing by 68% in 2005, employee count growing 104% in the past 18 months, and by the end of the year the company expects to have worked on more than 130 television series episodes since it began episodic production 5 years ago.

Radical Axis, an Atlanta studio that specializes in animation and design for broadcast, is quickly establishing itself as a strong player in the broadcast animation field. Focusing on development, episodic and commercial work, Radical Axis continues to experience amazing growth with sales increasing by 68% in 2005, employee count growing 104% in the past 18 months, and by the end of the year the company expects to have worked on more than 130 television series episodes since it began episodic production 5 years ago.

Best known for its work on the extremely popular television series Aqua Teen Hunger Force for Cartoon Network's sister network Adult Swim, the studio also provides animation for other Adult Swim series including Squidbillies and 12oz. Mouse. The studio also provided animation for series previously in production such as Perfect Hair Forever and Sealab 2021. Earlier this year the studio signed on to produce the new David Cross, John Benjamin series Freak Show for Comedy Central.

"Based on our tremendous growth and success, we predict Radical Axis will become even more influential in the animation industry in the coming years. We are committed to delivering above client expectations and providing clients with the same unique and creative work they have come to expect from studios in New York or on the West Coast,"
said Scott Fry, Radical Axis CEO/Creative Director. "Our reputation for providing cost effective, creative and inventive solutions for our clients has been fueled by our ability to leverage our team's diverse experiences in animation, advertising, broadcast and film."

Founded in 2000 by Fry, Radical Axis is able to provide clients services including creation, execution and delivery of broadcast ready content. Originally operating out of a storage closet at Cartoon Network, the company quickly expanded to its own facility in Midtown Atlanta. Since then, the studio has expanded its headquarters three separate times to meet the needs of its rapidly growing client base.

To date, Radical Axis has worked on more than 75 television episodes and by the end of 2006 expects that number to reach more than 130. In addition, Radical Axis is wrapping up work on the full-length animated feature film based on Aqua Teen Hunger Force. In addition to its work on animated television series, the company has a commercial division devoted specifically to providing animation and design services for television commercials, promos, title sequences and network IDs. In 2005, Radical Axis's commercial group averaged a new spot every 3.5 days and is expected to surpass that number by a large margin in 2006. Able to handle commercial projects from start to finish, Radical Axis has worked on projects for a variety of businesses including Cartoon Network, Kellogg's, Turner Broadcasting, L'Oreal, TNT, Wal-Mart and Campbell's Soup.

Radical Axis also develops original animation concepts for networks looking to add animated content to their line-ups. Radical Axis is currently focusing its growth on companies and networks outside of Atlanta and hires talent from across the U.S. and abroad including talent from as far away as Argentina.
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